Drama, Movie Review, Screenplay Review 0 comments on Gook – JUSTIN CHON

Gook – JUSTIN CHON

Gook Book Cover Gook
August 18, 2017
Justin Chon
Justin Chon
James J. Yi, Alex Chi
Justin Chon, Simone Baker, David So, Sang Chon, Curtiss Cook Jr., Ben Munoz

Set against the backdrop of the 1992 LA Riots comes the story of Eli (Justin Chon), a 26-year old Korean-American who, together with his brother Daniel (David So), owns a run-down shoe store in Paramount/South-Central Los Angeles. As the Rodney King verdict is reached, the LAPD is powerless against the erupting anger from the black community. The riots take place not too far from Eli's shoe store where Kamilla (Simone Baker), a motherless 11-year-old black girl, loves to hang out instead of going to school. Her older brother Keith (Curtiss Cook Jr), projecting his economic shortcomings, harbors hate toward Eli. Under the pretense of wanting to rob Eli's inventory of sneakers worth thousands of dollars, Keith confronts Eli.

Talk about breaking Asian American stereotypes in cinema! Justin Chon, writer, director and main actor of “Gook” brings to you the movie that many of us Asian Americans have been waiting for. He does what I’ve always wanted to do as an artist; he screams “Hey, your life is shitty, but so is mine. Quit pretending that I don’t exist.”

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Writing Craft/Creativity 1 comment on On Joy and Rejection

On Joy and Rejection

Last week, I was undulating between two emotions: pride and disappointment. For one, my film I CAN I WILL I DID screened at the Asian American International Film Festival in New York to a sold out crowd. It was invited back for an encore screening the following week and picked up its third festival award (this time the Audience Choice Award). In addition to that, we received invitations to two mainstream film festivals. I am beyond thrilled! I want to thank my Facebook friends, film collaborators and blogging community for the kind congratulatory words that were sent my way. Filmmakers bare their souls for everyone to see and make themselves vulnerable to scrutiny and pain. An audience that is moved by what you have to say, is everything.

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Book Review, Dystopian 0 comments on The Handmaid’s Tale – MARGARET ATWOOD

The Handmaid’s Tale – MARGARET ATWOOD

The Handmaid's Tale Book Cover The Handmaid's Tale
Margaret Atwood
Fiction
Anchor
1986
311

A woman describes her life in the Republic of Gilead, a dystopian society where an authoritarian Christian extremist regime has transformed the United States into a nation that operates by a caste system. Offred, named after her master ("Of Fred"), is classified as a handmaid and is therefore subjugated to sexual servitude to help curb infertility. Each month during the time of her ovulation, Offred must have ceremonious sex with her assigned commander (while his cold-hearted wife is required to be present ) in hopes that she may conceive of a child that would belong to the couple. Though women are forbidden to read and write, Offred uses this narrative to reflect upon her current life and directly compare it to the time before, when she was still a working woman, a loving wife and a devoted mother. It was a time, when she was still independent and free.

We are living in an era that has enabled an openly misogynist man to become president. Backed in part by alt-right religious fanatics, Trump’s administration actively works on dismantling protections for minority groups, including women. Reading Margaret Atwood’s 1986 novel “The Handmaid’s Tale” against this backdrop strikes a particularly sensitive chord with me. Her story is set in a world that represents my worst fears, a world where I’m no longer allowed to follow my passions such as reading, writing and filmmaking, and where I have been forced to relinquish autonomy over my own body. Continue Reading “The Handmaid’s Tale – MARGARET ATWOOD”